3:13 pm - Sunday December 16, 0744

Colorado College – April events calendar

Highlights:

·         “Religion and Religiosity: A Jaundiced Neurobiological Perspective,” a lecture by Robert Sapolsky

·         Intersection Trio, the second in Colorado College Summer Music Festival’s Intermezzo Season

·         “First Principles: Five Keys for Restoring America’s Prosperity,” the 2013 H. Chase Stone Lecture, given by John B. Taylor

·         The two-day Pikes Peak Regional History Day Competition, featuring area middle- and high-school students

·         The annual Big Cool Science Festival, with interactive demonstrations

·         The 2013 State of the Rockies Conference, a two-day event in which former Colorado Gov. Richard Lamm will receive the Champion of the Rockies Award

·         “Misquoting Jesus: Scribes Who Changed the Scriptures and Readers Who May Never Know,” a lecture by Bart D. Ehrman

 

Calendar of Events: April 2013

For more information on a specific event, directions or disability accommodation, call (719) 389-6607. The News and Events website, www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/, features updates and links to event news releases. To receive a free e-mail version of this monthly calendar, go to www.coloradocollege.edu/newsevents/calendar/subscribe.dot.

Wednesday, April 3, 2013
Luncheon: Lecture: “Properties of Violence: Law and Land Grant Struggle in Northern New Mexico” — David Correia will speak about his latest book, “Properties of Violence: Law and Land Grant Struggle in Northern New Mexico.” Through a compelling story about the conflict over a notorious Mexican-period land grant in northern New Mexico, Correia examines how law and property are constituted through violence and social struggle. Spain and Mexico populated what is today New Mexico and Southern Colorado through large common property land grants to sheepherders and agriculturalists. After the U.S.-Mexican War the area saw rampant land speculation and dubious property adjudication. Nearly all of the huge land grants were rejected by U.S. courts or acquired by land speculators. The Tierra Amarilla land grant, in northern New Mexico, is one of the most notorious. In his recent book, “Properties of Violence,” Correia tells a largely unknown history of property conflict in Tierra Amarilla characterized by nearly constant violence — night riding and fence cutting, pitched gun battles, and tanks rumbling along the rutted dirt roads of northern New Mexico. This legal geography includes a remarkable cast of characters: millionaire sheep barons, Spanish anarchists, hooded Klansmen, Puerto Rican terrorists, and undercover FBI agents. By placing property and law at the center of this study, “Properties of Violence” provocatively suggests that violence is not the opposite of property but rather is essential to its operation. Cost to attend is $17 (includes buffet lunch). For more information on the lecture or to make a reservation, please call 389-6334 or email swshulbert@coloradocollege.edu by Friday, March 29.
12 p.m., Gaylord Hall, main floor of Worner Campus Center, 902 N. Cascade Ave., $17 (includes buffet lunch) general admission

Lecture: “Religion and Religiosity: A Jaundiced Neurobiological Perspective” — Robert Sapolsky is a MacArthur “Genius” Fellow, a professor of biology and neurology at Stanford University, and a research associate with the Institute of Primate Research at the National Museum of Kenya. In addition to “A Primate’s Memoir,” which won the 2001 Bay Area Book Reviewers Award in nonfiction, Sapolsky has written three other books, including “The Trouble with Testosterone,” “Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers” and “Monkeyluv and Other Essays on our Lives as Animals.” In addition to numerous scholarly works, his popular writings on science have appeared in diverse publications, such as Discover and The New Yorker. In 2008, Sapolsky was awarded Rockefeller University’s Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science.
7 p.m., Shove Memorial Chapel, 1010 N. Nevada Ave., free

Concert: Deer Tick — The band Deer Tick will perform.
7 p.m., Armstrong Theatre, inside Armstrong Hall, 14 E. Cache La Poudre St., Tickets: Worner Campus Center Desk,  $20 general admission

Concert: Intersection Trio — The Colorado College Summer Music Festival presents Intersection Trio, the second in its Intermezzo Season. Laura Frautschi, violin; Kristina Reiko Cooper, cello; and festival faculty John Novacek, piano, perform a blend of classical, jazz, Latin, Broadway/film music, vital new commissions and the group’s own original compositions and arrangements. This program includes works by de Falla, Debussy, Piazzolla, John Novacek’s piano trio arrangement of Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” and Japanese composer Tomojiro Ikenouchi’s “Ballade sur un air japonais ancien.” This concert is sponsored in part by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities Professorship.
7:30 p.m., Packard Hall, 5 W. Cache La Poudre St., Tickets: Available at Worner Desk, TicketsWest, at the door, $5 non-CC students, $25 general admission

Thursday, April 4, 2013
Lecture: John B. Taylor: “First Principles: Five Keys for Restoring America’s Prosperity” — John B. Taylor, the Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics at Stanford University, will give the 2013 H. Chase Stone Lecture. He won the 2012 Hayek Prize for his latest book, “First Principles: Five Keys for Restoring America’s Prosperity,” which also is the title of his talk. Taylor has an active interest in public policy. He served as senior economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers from 1976 to 1977, as a member of the Council from 1989 to 1991, as a member of the Congressional Budget Office’s Panel of Economic Advisers from 1995 to 2001 and as undersecretary of the treasury for international affairs from 2001 to 2005. Among many awards, Taylor received the Bradley Prize for his economic research and policy achievements, the Adam Smith Award from the National Association for Business Economics, the Alexander Hamilton Award and the Treasury Distinguished Service Award for his policy contributions at the U.S. Treasury and the Medal of the Republic of Uruguay for his work in resolving the 2002 financial crisis.
7:30 p.m., Gates Common Room, third floor of Palmer Hall, 1025 N. Cascade Ave. (east of Tutt Library), free

Concert: Student Recital: Andrew Pope, clarinet; Usaama Alnaji, piano — Clarinetist Andrew Pope ’13, pianist Usaama Alnaji ’14 and friends present a concert of music by Beethoven, Brahms, Khachaturian and Copland.
7:30 p.m., Packard Hall, 5 W. Cache La Poudre St., free

Friday, April 5, 2013
Competition: Pikes Peak Regional History Day Competition — Area middle and high school students will present their historical research as papers, websites, backboard exhibits, documentaries or dramatic performances at the regional competition of 2013 National History Day. Winners will go on to compete at the state contest in May. First rounds will be held Friday evening from 7-9 p.m. On Saturday, final rounds will be held from 8 a.m.-noon and the awards ceremony starts at 3 p.m. Many contests are open to the public for viewing.
7 p.m., Palmer Hall, 1025 N. Cascade Ave. (east of Tutt Library), free

Saturday, April 6, 2013
Competition: Pikes Peak Regional 2013 National History Day Competition — Area middle and high school students will present their historical research as papers, websites, backboard exhibits, documentaries, or dramatic performances at the regional competition of 2013 National History Day. Winners will go on to compete at the state contest in May. First rounds will be held Friday evening from 7-9 p.m. On Saturday, final rounds will be held from 8 a.m.-noon and the awards ceremony starts at 3 p.m. Many contests are open to the public for viewing.
8 a.m., Palmer Hall, 1025 N. Cascade Ave. (east of Tutt Library), free

Exhibit: The Big Cool Science Festival — A day of fun science demonstrations for the whole family, with indoor and outdoor activities throughout the day, and two interactive demonstrations. The special presentations by CC students, staff and professors will be:
11 a.m.: Fire Chemistry at the Fishbowl (Olin 1) —  demonstrations on chemistry reactions with colorful sparks and solutions;
1 p.m.: Water Science at the Fishbowl (Olin 1) — demonstrations with water, dry ice and super cold liquid nitrogen. There will also be tours of the greenhouse throughout the day for those interested in plants and flowers.
Ongoing activities: Indoors: LN2 ice cream, slime, silly putty, instant worms, baby diaper dissection, iron in cereals/starch in crackers, jellybean test, red and green soda, paperclip touch test, making stethoscopes, the zoo, the Astronomical Society, lasers, lenses, fiber optics, ray boxes, mirrors, colored shadow lights, black lights, fluorescent items, phosphorescent glow board, can crush, Bernoulli, art with shaving cream, carrot submarine, acid/base neutralization with vinegar and baking soda, invisible ink and non-Newtonian fluids and more. Outdoors: face painting, air brushing, rockets, pinhole theater, tin foil boats, phonebook tug o’war and coloring in 3D.
11 a.m., Barnes Science Center, 1040 N. Nevada Ave, free

Monday, April 8, 2013
Conference: State of the Rockies Conference: Day 1 — The 2013 State of the Rockies Project presents “Citizen Science in the Rockies: Outdoor Adventure Strengthening Knowledge of Nature.” Moderator: J. Thomas McMurray, independent investor and co-founder of nonprofits the Marine Venture Foundation, Ocean Foundation and Blue Cloud Spatial. Talks and presentations on citizen science in action:
Carson McMurray ’12, “Uses of Citizen Science on the 2012 Down the Colorado Expedition – Blue Cloud Mapping Effort”
Scott Loarie, postdoctoral fellow in the department of global ecology at the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, Calif. Focus on crowd-sourced ‘citizen-science’ data
Brendan Weiner, program director at Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, Bozeman, Mont. Focus on pairing adventurers and science, “Turning to Adventure Athletes for Data Collection.”
The event will include time for Q and A, as well as refreshments and casual conversation. For more information visit the website at: https://www.coloradocollege.edu/stateoftherockies/conference or contact Brendan P. Boepple, program coordinator, State of the Rockies Project at brendan.boepple@coloradocollege.edu
7:30 p.m., Richard F. Celeste Theatre, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Tuesday, April 9, 2013
Conference: State of the Rockies Conference: Day 2 — The Colorado College 2013 State of the Rockies Project presents “Outdoor Recreation and the Winter Olympics: Companion or Threat to the Rockies?” The event will include the Rockies Project introduction and 2013 Rockies Report Card unveiling. Project student researchers will share their research. President Jill Tiefenthaler will present the 2012-13 Colorado College Champion of the Rockies award to Richard Lamm, three-term former governor of Colorado. Gov. Lamm will present “The Early Colorado Environmental Movement and the 1976 Winter Olympics Controversy.” Ceil Folz, president and CEO of the Vail Valley Foundation, will present “Major Events … Bringing the World to Colorado and Colorado to the World: Vail Resorts hosting of Feb. 2015 World Cup Ski Championships.” The event will include time for Q and A and refreshments and casual conversation. For more information please visit the conference website at https://www.coloradocollege.edu/stateoftherockies/conference/ or contact Brendan P. Boepple, program coordinator, State of the Rockies Project, at brendan.boepple@coloradocollege.edu
7:30 p.m., Richard F. Celeste Theatre, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Wednesday, April 10, 2013
Music at Midday — CC music students will perform vocal and instrumental selections.
12:15 p.m., Packard Hall, 5 W. Cache La Poudre St., free

Thursday, April 11, 2013
“Misquoting Jesus: Scribes Who Changed the Scriptures and Readers Who May Never Know” — Bart D. Ehrman is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. A graduate of Wheaton College (Illinois), Ehrman received both his master’s of divinity and his Ph.D. from Princeton Theological Seminary, where his 1985 doctoral dissertation was awarded magna cum laude. Since then, he has published extensively in the fields of New Testament and Early Christianity, having written or edited 21 books, numerous scholarly articles and dozens of book reviews. Among his most recent books are a Greek-English edition of “The Apostolic Fathers” for the Loeb Classical Library (Harvard University Press), an assessment of the newly discovered “Gospel of Judas” (Oxford University Press) and two New York Times bestsellers: “God’s Problem” (an assessment of the biblical views of suffering) and “Misquoting Jesus” (an overview of the changes found in the surviving copies of the New Testament and of the scribes who produced them). He has appeared on such popular programs as the Daily Show with Jon Stewart and the Colbert Report.
7 p.m., Armstrong Theatre, inside Armstrong Hall, 14 E. Cache La Poudre St., free

Friday, April 12, 2013
Lecture: Economics and Business Seminar Series Talk: Rimvydas Baltaduonis — Rimvydas Baltaduonis, assistant professor in the Department of Economics, Gettysburg College, will present the next in the Economics and Business 2012-13 Seminar Series talks. Baltaduonis’s research interests include economics of institutions, experimental economics, industrial organization, energy economics and mechanism design, with specific interests in energy and financial markets. Refreshments will be served.
2:30 p.m., Palmer Hall, 1025 N. Cascade Ave. (east of Tutt Library), free

Theater: Student Opera Production: “Blue Monday” — Harlem in the 1920s was the place to enjoy jazz music, nightlife, see celebrities, and partake in all sorts of illicit pleasures. This student production celebrates that legendary era with an adapted version of George Gershwin’s “Blue Monday,” featuring some of Gershwin’s best known songs, all set in a basement speakeasy that ends with an operatic-scale tragedy. Daniel Fosha, director; Daniel Brink, music director.
7:30 p.m., Packard Hall, 5 W. Cache La Poudre St., free

Saturday, April 13, 2013
Theater: Student Opera Production: “Blue Monday” — Harlem in the 1920s was the place to enjoy jazz music, nightlife, see celebrities, and partake in all sorts of illicit pleasures. This student production celebrates that legendary era with an adapted version of George Gershwin’s “Blue Monday,” featuring some of Gershwin’s best known songs, all set in a basement speakeasy that ends with an operatic-scale tragedy. Daniel Fosha, director; Daniel Brink, music director.
7:30 p.m., Packard Hall, 5 W. Cache La Poudre St., free

Tuesday, April 16, 2013
Reception: Robert Adams: “A Place Apart” — This special preview reception features gallery talks by the exhibition’s student curators. The exhibition “A Place Apart” opens for regular viewing hours on Monday, April 22.
4:30 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Concert: Duo Esprit In Concert: An Evening of Harp and Viola — Colorado College harp instructor Ann Marie Liss and Colorado Symphony Orchestra principal violist Basil Vendryes come together as Duo Esprit to explore the repertoire for the unique collaboration of harp and viola. Experience the new sounds and musical creativity of commissioned original works by prodigious and distinguished composers from Colorado and around the world, as well as favorites of Gershwin and Chopin.
7:30 p.m., Packard Hall, 5 W. Cache La Poudre St., free

Monday, April 22, 2013 – Saturday, June 15, 2013
Exhibit: Robert Adams: “A Place Apart: Colorado and the American West” — For more than 40 years, Robert Adams’s photographs have celebrated the beauty of the American West, often focusing his attention on overlooked subjects and vistas: the quiet streets of small towns, the wide-open prairies of the Eastern plains, or the unexpected junctures when wilderness and urban development meet. Adams taught English at Colorado College from 1962 to 1970 before leaving to become a full-time photographer. Adams’s photographs are held in several major museum collections, including the Denver Art Museum, The National Gallery, Yale University and the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center. A major retrospective exhibition,  “The Place We Live,” organized by Yale University, is currently on tour, with venues in the United States, Canada and Europe. Exhibition hours: April 22-May 14: Monday-Saturday, 1-7 p.m.; from May 23-June 15: Tuesday-Saturday, 1-7 p.m., closed May 15-22.
1 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Monday, April 22, 2013
“Resurrection: The Elwha River and the Past, Present, and Future of Restoration in the American West” — 
Andrew Fahlund will reflect upon 15 years of experience bringing rivers back to life, culminating with the removal of the two largest dams on the Elwha River in Washington. Fahlund joined Stanford University as the first executive director of “Water in the West” in January 2012. His talk, the 2013 Timothy C. Linnemann Lecture on the Environment, will explore the complex interactions of the physical, biological, economic and cultural dimensions of river restoration.  He will then look forward to where we hope to be with river restoration 15 years from now and how we might get there.
6 p.m., Richard F. Celeste Theatre, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Thursday, April 25, 2013
Luncheon: Lecture: “Doubting and Dreaming: Native American Women Write about the West” — Janice Gould, associate professor of Women’s and Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, will discuss the poetry of Native American women writers, including Joy Harjo, Luci Tapahonso, Ofelia Zepeda, Gail Tremblay and herself.  She will focus on the ways in which American Indian female poets narrate and inscribe Western landscape and history. This is a joint Aficionados/Woman’s Educational Society lecture. Cost to attend is $17 (includes buffet lunch). For more information on the lecture or to make a reservation, please call 389-6334 or email swshulbert@coloradocollege.edu.
11:45 a.m., Gaylord Hall, main floor of Worner Campus Center, 902 N. Cascade Ave., $17 (includes buffet lunch) general admission

Concert: An Evening of Elegant Chamber Music — The Colorado College Summer Music Festival presents the third concert in its Intermezzo Season. Festival faculty artists perform music of Mozart, Beethoven and Brahms. Scott Yoo, festival orchestra conductor, violin; Toby Appel, viola; Michael Thornton, horn; and Susan Grace, piano, perform in this benefit concert. Full repertoire information at www.coloradocollege.edu/musicfestival/intermezzo-season.
6 p.m., Packard Hall, 5 W. Cache La Poudre St., Tickets: Available at Worner Desk, TicketsWest, at the door, $5 for students, $35 general admission

Friday, April 26, 2013
Concert: CC Choir Concert — The Colorado College Choir, under the direction of Deborah Jenkins Teske, will present Mozart’s “Grand Mass in C Minor.” Scored for double choir, full orchestra and four soloists, this magnificent work is considered by many to be Mozart’s greatest achievement in choral music. The performance will feature soloists Judeth Shay Burns (CC music department faculty), Amy Mushall, Brian Harris and Jim Sena.
7:30 p.m., Shove Memorial Chapel, 1010 N. Nevada Ave., free

Sunday, April 28, 2013
Guitar Ensemble Concert — The Colorado College Guitar Ensemble, directed by Dale Miller, will feature current paraprofessional and CC music alumnus Neil Hesse ’11, along with Annika Davis and Sarah Spears. The quartet will perform works by Michael Praetorius, Antonio Vivaldi, Joseph Küffner, John Duarte, Gabriel Fauré and others.
3 p.m., Packard Hall, 5 W. Cache La Poudre St., free

For help finding locations of these events see the campus map at www.coloradocollege.edu/campusmap or call (719) 389-6607

 

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