2:39 am - Thursday September 21, 2017

Reducing Adult Obesity Rates Could Save Colorado Billions by 2030

Latinos disproportionately affected by obesity

5 percent drop in BMI could cut health care costs in the state

Washington, D.C., September 24, 2012 – Colorado could dramatically cut health care costs and prevent obesity-related diseases if the state reduced the average body mass index (BMI) of its residents by just 5 percent by 2030, according to a new analysis in the F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future 2012 report.

The report, released by Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), also shows that if obesity rates continue on their current trajectories, 44.8 percent of Colorado’s adult residents could be obese by 2030. The projected consequences would be significant: 519,150 new cases of type 2 diabetes, 1.2 million new cases of coronary heart disease, stroke and hypertension, 786,503 new cases of arthritis, and 176,171 new cases of obesity-related cancer.

Hispanics disproportionately suffer from obesity and its related diseases and make up 20.9 percent of Colorado’s total population, according to the latest Census report.

“This study shows us two futures for America’s health,” said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, RWJF president and CEO. “At every level of government, we must pursue policies that preserve health, prevent disease and reduce health care costs. Nothing less is acceptable.”

The analysis, which was commissioned by TFAH and RWJF and conducted by the National Heart Forum, is based on a peer-reviewed model published last year in The Lancet. Findings include:

How Reducing Obesity Could Lower Health Care Costs and Disease Rates

If residents’ BMI dropped by 5 percent, Colorado could save 7.1 percent in health care costs, which would equate to savings of $11 billion by 2030. A person who is 5 feet, 10 inches tall and weighs 210 pounds, would be classified as obese (with a BMI of 30.1). A 5 percent reduction in his or her BMI would be the equivalent of losing roughly 10.5 pounds.

The number of Colorado residents who could be spared from developing new cases of obesity-related diseases includes:

· type 2 diabetes: 108,067 people; · coronary heart diease and stroke: 95,428 people; · hypertension: 97,935 people; · arthritis: 52,652 people; and · obesity-related cancer: 7,624 people.

Report Recommendations

On the basis of the data collected and a comprehensive analysis, TFAH and RWJF recommend making investments in obesity prevention in a way that matches the severity of the health and financial toll the epidemic takes on the nation. The report provides a series of policy recommendations, including:

· Fully implement the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act through new school meal standards and updating nutrition standards for snack foods and beverages in schools; · Increase investments in effective, evidence-based obesity-prevention programs; · Protect the Prevention and Public Health Fund and fully implement the National Prevention Strategy and Action Plan; · Make physical education and physical activity a priority in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act; · Finalize the guidelines of Interagency Working Group on Food Marketed to Children; · Fully support healthy nutrition in federal food programs; and · Encourage full use of preventive health care services and provide support beyond the doctor’s office.

“We know a lot more about how to prevent obesity than we did 10 years ago,” said Jeff Levi, PhD, executive director of TFAH. “This report also outlines how policies like increasing physical activity time in schools and making fresh fruits and vegetables more affordable can help make healthier choices easier. Small changes can add up to a big difference. Policy changes can help make healthier choices easier for Americans in their daily lives.”

The full report with state rankings in all categories is available on TFAH’s website at www.healthyamericans.org and RWJF’s website at www.rwjf.org. The report was supported by a grant from RWJF.

STATE-BY-STATE POTENTIAL HEALTH CARE COST SAVINGS BY 2030 IF STATES REDUCE AVERAGE BODY MASS INDEX BY 5 PERCENT

1. California ($81,702,000,000); 2. Texas ($54,194,000,000); 3. New York ($40,017,000,000); 4. Florida ($34,436,000,000); 5. Illinois ($28,185,000,000); 6. Ohio ($26,328,000,000); 7. Pennsylvania ($24,498,000,000); 8. Michigan ($24,187,000,000); 9. Georgia ($22,743,000,000); 10. North Carolina ($21,101,000,000); 11. Virginia ($18,114,000,000); 12. Washington ($14,729,000,000); 13. Massachusetts ($14,055,000,000); 14. Maryland ($13,836,000,000); 15. Tennessee ($13,827,000,000); 16. Arizona ($13,642,000,000); 17. Indiana ($13,400,000,000); 18. Missouri ($13,368,000,000); 19. Wisconsin ($11,962,000,000); 20. Minnesota ($11,630,000,000); 21. Colorado ($10,794,000,000); 22. Louisiana ($9,839,000,000); 23. Alabama ($9,481,000,000); 24. Kentucky ($9,437,000,000); 25. South Carolina ($9,309,000,000); 26. Oregon ($7,938,000,000); 27. Oklahoma ($7,444,000,000); 28. Connecticut ($7,370,000,000); 29. Mississippi ($6,120,000,000); 30. Arkansas ($6,054,000,000); 31. Kansas ($5,979,000,000); 32. Nevada ($5,921,000,000); 33. Utah ($5,843,000,000); 34. Iowa ($5,702,000,000); 35. New Mexico ($4,095,000,000); 36. Nebraska ($3,686,000,000); 37. West Virginia ($3,638,000,000); 38. Idaho ($3,280,000,000); 39. New Hampshire ($3,257,000,000); 40. Maine ($2,870,000,000); 41. Hawaii ($2,704,000,000); 42. Rhode Island ($2,478,000,000); 43. Montana ($1,939,000,000); 44. Delaware ($1,912,000,000); 45. South Dakota ($1,553,000,000); 46. Alaska ($1,530,000,000); 47. New Jersey ($1,391,000,000); 48. Vermont ($1,376,000,000); 49. North Dakota ($1,177,000,000); 50. Wyoming ($1,088,000,000); 51. District of Columbia ($1,026,000,000).

2011 STATE-BY-STATE ADULT OBESITY RATES FOR HISPANICS

According to recently released CDC data, part of the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, adult obesity rates by state for Hispanics from highest to lowest were:

1. South Dakota (40.0%); 2. Louisiana (37.5%); 3. Michigan (36.7%); 4. Idaho (36.1%); 5. Indiana (35.1%); 6. Texas (34.5%); 7. Arizona (33.6%); 8. Iowa (33.2%); 9. Pennsylvania (32.9%); 10. Connecticut (32.6%); 11. Alaska (32.3%); 12. Ohio (32.2%); 13. Minnesota (31.6%); 14. Virginia (31.4%); 15. Massachusetts (31.0%); 16. Kansas (30.5%); 17. Maine (30.3%); 18. California (30.3%); 19. New Mexico (30.0%); 20. Nebraska (29.8%); 21. Nevada (29.2%); 22. West Virginia (29.1%); 23. North Carolina (29.0%); 24. Alabama (28.8%); 25. Oregon (28.8%); 26. Oklahoma (28.7%); 27. (tie) Florida (27.9%); and Washington (27.9%); 29. Missouri (27.8%); 30. New Jersey (27.2%); 31. Hawaii (26.9%); 32. Mississippi (26.8%); 33. Colorado (26.6%); 34. Rhode Island (26.5%); 35. Georgia (26.4%); 36. New York (26.3%); 37. Wyoming (25.9%); 38. Illinois (25.2%); 39. South Carolina (25.0%); 40. Utah (24.2%); 41. Vermont (23.5%); 42. New Hampshire (22.9%); 43. Montana (22.5%); 44. Delaware (22.4%); 45. Kentucky (22.2%); 46. Maryland (20.9%); 47. Arkansas (18.4%); 48. D.C. (13.3%); 49. North Dakota (N/A); 50 Tennessee (N/A); 51. Wisconsin (N/A).

Note: 1 = Highest rate of adult obesity, 51 = lowest rate of adult obesity. Individuals with a body mass index (a calculation based on weight and height ratios) of 30 or higher are considered obese.

Trust for America’s Health is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to saving lives by protecting the health of every community and working to make disease prevention a national priority. For more information, visit www.healthyamericans.org

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focuses on the pressing health and health care issues facing our country. As the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to improving the health and health care of all Americans, the Foundation works with a diverse group of organizations and individuals to identify solutions and achieve comprehensive, meaningful and timely change. For 40 years the Foundation has brought experience, commitment, and a rigorous, balanced approach to the problems that affect the health and health care of those it serves. When it comes to helping Americans lead healthier lives and get the care they need, the Foundation expects to make a difference in your lifetime. For more information, visit www.rwjf.org. Follow the Foundation on Twitter www.rwjf.org/twitter or Facebook www.rwjf.org/facebook

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