9:34 pm - Wednesday December 13, 2017

Colorado College Events: July 2012

Monday, July 2, 2012

Concert: World Music Series – Novalima — Novalima creates a pioneering blend of soulful Afro-Peruvian rhythms and melodies with cutting-edge grooves of dub reggae, chilled-out electronica, and funky Latin beats. Based in Lima, Peru, Novalima’s sound appeals to fans of rootsy world music and progressive dance music in equal measure.
7 p.m., Armstrong Theatre, inside Armstrong Hall, 14 E. Cache La Poudre St., free

Tuesday, July 3, 2012

Exhibit: Lost and Found: A North Sea Collaboration — Carl Reed and Thomas Claesson — From April 24-July 14, IDEA Space will host a new collaborative exhibition by Professor of Art Carl Reed. This exhibit results from a narrative of unexpected relationships and circumstances. Thomas Claesson, who lives on an island off the west coast of Sweden, has assembled an enormous collection of “lost” objects — items that have washed up on shore, been abandoned or unearthed, or acquired through inheritance. When Claesson met Carl Reed, a sculptor who has worked for years with found objects, the two sensed the potential to realize an unusual collaborative project. The exhibition “Lost and Found” traces the dynamic of their collaborative process and explores ideas such as the urge to collect, layers of time, recycling, and the blurred distinction between art that is found and art that is made. Regular exhibition hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12:30-7 p.m.
12:30 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Exhibit: Lost and Found: A North Sea Collaboration — Carl Reed and Thomas Claesson — From April 24-July 14, IDEA Space will host a new collaborative exhibition by Professor of Art Carl Reed. This exhibit results from a narrative of unexpected relationships and circumstances. Thomas Claesson, who lives on an island off the west coast of Sweden, has assembled an enormous collection of “lost” objects — items that have washed up on shore, been abandoned or unearthed, or acquired through inheritance. When Claesson met Carl Reed, a sculptor who has worked for years with found objects, the two sensed the potential to realize an unusual collaborative project. The exhibition “Lost and Found” traces the dynamic of their collaborative process and explores ideas such as the urge to collect, layers of time, recycling, and the blurred distinction between art that is found and art that is made. Regular exhibition hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12:30-7 p.m.
12:30 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Thursday, July 5, 2012

Exhibit: Lost and Found: A North Sea Collaboration — Carl Reed and Thomas Claesson — From April 24-July 14, IDEA Space will host a new collaborative exhibition by Professor of Art Carl Reed. This exhibit results from a narrative of unexpected relationships and circumstances. Thomas Claesson, who lives on an island off the west coast of Sweden, has assembled an enormous collection of “lost” objects — items that have washed up on shore, been abandoned or unearthed, or acquired through inheritance. When Claesson met Carl Reed, a sculptor who has worked for years with found objects, the two sensed the potential to realize an unusual collaborative project. The exhibition “Lost and Found” traces the dynamic of their collaborative process and explores ideas such as the urge to collect, layers of time, recycling, and the blurred distinction between art that is found and art that is made. Regular exhibition hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12:30-7 p.m.
12:30 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Friday, July 6, 2012

Exhibit: Lost and Found: A North Sea Collaboration — Carl Reed and Thomas Claesson — From April 24-July 14, IDEA Space will host a new collaborative exhibition by Professor of Art Carl Reed. This exhibit results from a narrative of unexpected relationships and circumstances. Thomas Claesson, who lives on an island off the west coast of Sweden, has assembled an enormous collection of “lost” objects — items that have washed up on shore, been abandoned or unearthed, or acquired through inheritance. When Claesson met Carl Reed, a sculptor who has worked for years with found objects, the two sensed the potential to realize an unusual collaborative project. The exhibition “Lost and Found” traces the dynamic of their collaborative process and explores ideas such as the urge to collect, layers of time, recycling, and the blurred distinction between art that is found and art that is made. Regular exhibition hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12:30-7 p.m.
12:30 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Saturday, July 7, 2012

Psychos, Gangsters, Vampires, and Aliens: Great Movie Thrillers — Why are thrillers an important movie genre?  Why are they controversial?  This class will examine the history of the thriller, and ask some questions about its founding myths and themes. We will look at scenes from various kinds of thrillers to trace some common questions.  Sample topics include serial killers (Lang’s “M” [1931] and”The Silence of the Lambs” [1991] to political thrillers (“The Manchurian Candidate” [1962]), vampire thrillers (“Interview with The Vampire” [1994] to “Twilight” [2009), sci-fi thrillers (“Blade Runner” [1982]) and Alfred Hitchcock (maybe “North By Northwest” [1959]). Professor George Butte has taught in the English department at Colorado College since 1974. He specializes in the 18th and 19th century British novel, and teaches many film theory courses, with special interests in Hitchcock and film comedy. His most recent book is “I Know That You Know That I Know: Narrating Subjects from Moll Flanders to Marnie” (Ohio State Press, 2004). Professor Butte received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. He was a Woodrow Wilson Fellow from 1967-1968 and Rhodes Scholar from 1968-70. This class is part of the Enrich Your Life! series of courses for the community. For more information, visit the Enrich Your Life! website or call (719)389-6098.
9 a.m., Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., Tickets: 719-389-6098 or register via the website, $30 with a CC ID, $30 for students, $30 general admission

Exhibit: Lost and Found: A North Sea Collaboration — Carl Reed and Thomas Claesson — From April 24-July 14, IDEA Space will host a new collaborative exhibition by Professor of Art Carl Reed. This exhibit results from a narrative of unexpected relationships and circumstances. Thomas Claesson, who lives on an island off the west coast of Sweden, has assembled an enormous collection of “lost” objects — items that have washed up on shore, been abandoned or unearthed, or acquired through inheritance. When Claesson met Carl Reed, a sculptor who has worked for years with found objects, the two sensed the potential to realize an unusual collaborative project. The exhibition “Lost and Found” traces the dynamic of their collaborative process and explores ideas such as the urge to collect, layers of time, recycling, and the blurred distinction between art that is found and art that is made. Regular exhibition hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12:30-7 p.m.
12:30 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Sunday, July 8, 2012

Concert: An Evening of Inspirational Song with Denise Young — Denise Young is a soprano vocalist who blends opera, jazz, and gospel in her performances. Passionate about the African-American experience in song, she has performed with symphonies and professional chorales, as a principal and a guest artist, featuring Gershwin, Ellington, and spirituals. She performs the annual artist series at St. Joseph’s Cathedral in San Jose, Calif., her home for the past 16 years. Young has appeared with Grammy–award winning Christian artist Larnelle Harris as well as Phillip Bailey of Earth, Wind, and Fire. In 2008, Young had her operatic debut at Carnegie Hall, and in 2008 summer, staged her European debut in Ancona, Italy. In August 2009 and 2010 Young returned to Italy, appearing at the Alexander and Buono International Music Festival as a guest artist, performing works of Alfredo Catalani, Giuseppe Verdi, Joaquin Rodrigo, George Gershwin, and American Spirituals. She recently performed these works in concert with former secretary of state and concert pianist Condoleeza Rice. Young is currently completing work on the CD “Project Classique,” a compilation of opera and jazz classics. Busy in her role as an executive with the Apple retail stores, Young finds time to study the art of song with dramatic tenor Carl Franzen in San Jose. This concert also features talent from the Southern Colorado area. Tickets $15; $10 w/CC ID; $5 students. Tickets available at the door or by calling (719) 593-8400.
5 p.m., Packard Hall, 5 W. Cache La Poudre St., $10 with a CC ID, $15 general admission

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Exhibit: Lost and Found: A North Sea Collaboration — Carl Reed and Thomas Claesson — From April 24-July 14, IDEA Space will host a new collaborative exhibition by Professor of Art Carl Reed. This exhibit results from a narrative of unexpected relationships and circumstances. Thomas Claesson, who lives on an island off the west coast of Sweden, has assembled an enormous collection of “lost” objects — items that have washed up on shore, been abandoned or unearthed, or acquired through inheritance. When Claesson met Carl Reed, a sculptor who has worked for years with found objects, the two sensed the potential to realize an unusual collaborative project. The exhibition “Lost and Found” traces the dynamic of their collaborative process and explores ideas such as the urge to collect, layers of time, recycling, and the blurred distinction between art that is found and art that is made. Regular exhibition hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12:30-7 p.m.
12:30 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Exhibit: Lost and Found: A North Sea Collaboration — Carl Reed and Thomas Claesson — From April 24-July 14, IDEA Space will host a new collaborative exhibition by Professor of Art Carl Reed. This exhibit results from a narrative of unexpected relationships and circumstances. Thomas Claesson, who lives on an island off the west coast of Sweden, has assembled an enormous collection of “lost” objects — items that have washed up on shore, been abandoned or unearthed, or acquired through inheritance. When Claesson met Carl Reed, a sculptor who has worked for years with found objects, the two sensed the potential to realize an unusual collaborative project. The exhibition “Lost and Found” traces the dynamic of their collaborative process and explores ideas such as the urge to collect, layers of time, recycling, and the blurred distinction between art that is found and art that is made. Regular exhibition hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12:30-7 p.m.
12:30 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Exhibit: Lost and Found: A North Sea Collaboration — Carl Reed and Thomas Claesson — From April 24-July 14, IDEA Space will host a new collaborative exhibition by Professor of Art Carl Reed. This exhibit results from a narrative of unexpected relationships and circumstances. Thomas Claesson, who lives on an island off the west coast of Sweden, has assembled an enormous collection of “lost” objects — items that have washed up on shore, been abandoned or unearthed, or acquired through inheritance. When Claesson met Carl Reed, a sculptor who has worked for years with found objects, the two sensed the potential to realize an unusual collaborative project. The exhibition “Lost and Found” traces the dynamic of their collaborative process and explores ideas such as the urge to collect, layers of time, recycling, and the blurred distinction between art that is found and art that is made. Regular exhibition hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12:30-7 p.m.
12:30 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Concert: Free For All Summer Symphony: A Celebration of Charles Ansbacher and Bee Vradenburg — The Colorado Springs Philharmonic presents a night of music under starlit Colorado skies. Food and live performances start at 5 p.m. at the Colorado College Armstrong Quad. Philharmonic concert begins at 7 p.m., conducted by Music Director Josep Caballé-Domenech. Presented in partnership with Bee Vradenburg Foundation and Charles Ansbacher Foundation. July 13 is the rain back-up date.
5 p.m., Armstrong Quad, 14 E. Cache La Poudre St. (North of Armstrong Hall), free

Film: DATE CHANGED: Summer Film Series — “Singin’ in the Rain” — The ways we obtain information, and the ways we are entertained, have changed radically over the past 100 years. From the printed page to the silver screen, from the ‘talking box’ to the world wide web, media has undergone a series of revolutions in presentation, in ethics, and in content. What is ‘the media,’ and how is it depicted in movies? How does the constantly changing media landscape affect not only those who consume media, but also those who create it? This series will examine several fiction and documentary films that shine a light on the evolutions and circumlocutions of our slippery media culture. An American comedy musical film starring Gene Kelly, Donald O’Connor and Debbie Reynolds, “Singin’ in the Rain” offers a comic depiction of Hollywood, and its transition from silent films to “talkies.” Directed by Stanley Donan and Gene Kelly (1952). This series takes place Tuesday evenings for the screening, analysis, and lively discussion of films with Colorado College professors Dylan Nelson and Clay Haskell.
6:30 p.m., Screening Room, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Friday, July 13, 2012

Exhibit: Lost and Found: A North Sea Collaboration — Carl Reed and Thomas Claesson — From April 24-July 14, IDEA Space will host a new collaborative exhibition by Professor of Art Carl Reed. This exhibit results from a narrative of unexpected relationships and circumstances. Thomas Claesson, who lives on an island off the west coast of Sweden, has assembled an enormous collection of “lost” objects — items that have washed up on shore, been abandoned or unearthed, or acquired through inheritance. When Claesson met Carl Reed, a sculptor who has worked for years with found objects, the two sensed the potential to realize an unusual collaborative project. The exhibition “Lost and Found” traces the dynamic of their collaborative process and explores ideas such as the urge to collect, layers of time, recycling, and the blurred distinction between art that is found and art that is made. Regular exhibition hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12:30-7 p.m.
12:30 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Saturday, July 14, 2012

Digital Photography Workshop — The digital revolution has radically transformed the field of photography.  As digital cameras and software have become mainstream, incredible new photographic possibilities have emerged. This workshop will examine how the fundamentals of traditional photography relate to rapidly changing digital technology. Participants will explore digital techniques, workflow, and concepts of digital distribution. Prerequisites:  Interest in photography, basic computer skills, a digital camera and at least one lens. Professor Clay Haskell’s photography has taken him all over the world. As a Fulbright Fellow in photography, he documented the handover of Hong Kong to China. His work has been published by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, CBS, and CNN-SI.  Haskell is also an accomplished cinematographer. His most recent film, “The Hollywood Complex,” appeared on Showtime in March. This workshop is part of the Enrich Your Life! series of courses for the community.
10 a.m., Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., Tickets: 719-389-6098 or register via the website, $60 with a CC ID, $60 for students, $60 general admission

Exhibit: Lost and Found: A North Sea Collaboration — Carl Reed and Thomas Claesson — From April 24-July 14, IDEA Space will host a new collaborative exhibition by Professor of Art Carl Reed. This exhibit results from a narrative of unexpected relationships and circumstances. Thomas Claesson, who lives on an island off the west coast of Sweden, has assembled an enormous collection of “lost” objects — items that have washed up on shore, been abandoned or unearthed, or acquired through inheritance. When Claesson met Carl Reed, a sculptor who has worked for years with found objects, the two sensed the potential to realize an unusual collaborative project. The exhibition “Lost and Found” traces the dynamic of their collaborative process and explores ideas such as the urge to collect, layers of time, recycling, and the blurred distinction between art that is found and art that is made. Regular exhibition hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 12:30-7 p.m.
12:30 p.m., I.D.E.A. Space, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Sunday, July 15, 2012

Concert: Masakazu Ito in Concert — Ito is one of today’s top guitarists on the international concert circuit, acclaimed by musicians, composers, conductors, and critics for his mastery of the instrument and its repertoire. Since his professional debut in Tokyo in 1987, Ito has won top prizes in seven major international guitar competitions, including the Andres Segovia International Guitar Competition, the Tokyo International Guitar Competition, and the Guitar Foundation of America International Guitar Competition. The Los Angeles Times wrote, “Ito displayed conspicuous skill and tonal range… [he] proved himself to be a clean and technically adroit player, whizzing through thorny passages with aplomb.” He has been on the faculty at the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver since 1990. Tickets $15; $10 Guitar Society of Colorado Springs members, seniors, and with CC/ID; $5 students. Available at www.TicketsWest.com and at the door.
2 p.m., Packard Hall, 5 W. Cache La Poudre St., $15 general admission

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Film: DATE CHANGED: Summer Film Series — “Network” — The ways we obtain information, and the ways we are entertained, have changed radically over the past 100 years. From the printed page to the silver screen, from the ‘talking box’ to the world wide web, media has undergone a series of revolutions in presentation, in ethics, and in content. What is ‘the media,’ and how is it depicted in movies? How does the constantly changing media landscape affect not only those who consume media, but also those who create it? This series will examine several fiction and documentary films that shine a light on the evolutions and circumlocutions of our slippery media culture. In the movie “Network,” a TV network cynically exploits a deranged ex-TV anchor’s ravings and revelations about the media for their own profit. Directed by Sidney Lumet (1976) This series takes place Tuesday evenings for the screening, analysis, and lively discussion of great films with Colorado College professors Dylan Nelson and Clay Haskell.
6:30 p.m., Screening Room, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Concert: Central City Opera/Colorado Springs Conservatory Performing Arts Intensive Song Recital — Up to 20 of the nation’s most talented high school students study and perform in this award-winning performing arts intensive each summer for two weeks. Students from across the state and nation study drama, musical theater and opera. Nationally renowned instructors teach daily classes in dance, theater studies, opera, diction, and repertoire.
7 p.m., Richard F. Celeste Theatre, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., Tickets: Available at the door., $5 with a CC ID, $5 for students, $5 general admission

Thursday, July 19, 2012

Film: DATE CHANGED: Summer Film Series — “Page One: Inside The New York Times” — The ways we obtain information, and the ways we are entertained, have changed radically over the past 100 years. From the printed page to the silver screen, from the ‘talking box’ to the world wide web, media has undergone a series of revolutions in presentation, in ethics, and in content. What is ‘the media,’ and how is it depicted in movies? How does the constantly changing media landscape affect not only those who consume media, but also those who create it? This series will examine several fiction and documentary films that shine a light on the evolutions and circumlocutions of our slippery media culture. “Page One: Inside The New York Times” shows unprecedented access to the New York Times newsroom which yields a complex view of the transformation of a media landscape fraught with both peril and opportunity. This series takes place Tuesday evenings for the screening, analysis, and lively discussion of great films with Colorado College professors Dylan Nelson and Clay Haskell.
6:30 p.m., Screening Room, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Saturday, July 21, 2012

Cosmology and the Runaway Universe — For centuries, humans have looked up at the heavens and wondered about the origin and fate of the universe. Did the universe have a beginning? If so, how old is the universe? In the last 75 years we have learned the answers to many of these questions. The universe seems to have begun 13.7 billion years ago and has been expanding ever since. However, the answers to these questions have inspired new questions. Will the universe expand forever or will gravity someday stop the expansion and reverse it, leading to a “big crunch?” We think we know the answer to this question as well. In 1998, two rival teams of astronomers discovered that the expansion is actually accelerating! We know how the universe is expanding but we don’t understand why. The 2011 Nobel Prize was awarded to the leaders of these teams for their discovery. The “stuff” that causes accelerated expansion has been dubbed dark energy.  Understanding the nature of dark energy is likely to shake the very foundations of our conception of the physical world. in this class, students will look at the latest images and data from the Hubble Space Telescope, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and other modern telescopes and discuss what we know about the universe and what is still a mystery. Professor Shane Burns teaches physics at Colorado College.  He is a member the Supernova Cosmology Project, one of the two teams that discovered accelerated expansion, the work that earned the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics. He has worked with 2011 Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter since they were graduate students at UC Berkeley in the early 80’s. This class is part of the Enrich Your Life! series of courses for the community.
9 a.m., Barnes Science Center, Tickets: 719-389-6098 or register via the website, $30 with a CC ID, $30 for students, $30 general admission

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Film: DATE CHANGED: Summer Film Series — “The Social Network” — The ways we obtain information, and the ways we are entertained, have changed radically over the past 100 years. From the printed page to the silver screen, from the ‘talking box’ to the world wide web, media has undergone a series of revolutions in presentation, in ethics, and in content. What is ‘the media,’ and how is it depicted in movies? How does the constantly changing media landscape affect not only those who consume media, but also those who create it? This series will examine several fiction and documentary films that shine a light on the evolutions and circumlocutions of our slippery media culture. Harvard student Mark Zuckerberg creates the social networking website that would become known as Facebook, but is later sued by two brothers who claim he stole their idea, and the co-founder who was later squeezed out of the business. Directed by David Fincher (2010). This series takes place Tuesday evenings for the screening, analysis, and lively discussion of great films with Colorado College professors Dylan Nelson and Clay Haskell.
6:30 p.m., Screening Room, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Thursday, July 26, 2012

Film: DATE CHANGED: Summer Film Series — “Catfish” — The ways we obtain information, and the ways we are entertained, have changed radically over the past 100 years. From the printed page to the silver screen, from the ‘talking box’ to the world wide web, media has undergone a series of revolutions in presentation, in ethics, and in content. What is ‘the media,’ and how is it depicted in movies? How does the constantly changing media landscape affect not only those who consume media, but also those who create it? This series will examine several fiction and documentary films that shine a light on the evolutions and circumlocutions of our slippery media culture. In late 2007, filmmakers Ariel Schulman and Henry Joost sensed a story unfolding as they began to film the life of Ariel’s brother, Nev. They had no idea that their project would lead to the most exhilarating and unsettling months of their lives. A reality thriller that is a shocking product of our times, “Catfish” is a riveting story of love, deception, and grace within a labyrinth of online intrigue. Directed by Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman (2010). This series takes place Tuesday evenings for the screening, analysis, and lively discussion of great films with Colorado College professors Dylan Nelson and Clay Haskell.
6:30 p.m., Screening Room, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

Saturday, July 28, 2012

Writing Memoir and Personal Essay: Turning True Life Stories into Art — The paradox of writing personal narrative is this: Telling our stories is in our DNA and comes naturally, until we sit down to write them. In this class, we will look at how a wide variety of authors — from Anne Lamott to Ernest Hemingway — have approached the memoir, and how the best personal narrative works. Through discussions of exemplary samples from this burgeoning and multi-faceted genre, and warming up with in-class writing exercises, we will turn on the circuits of memory, discover what we really want to write about, and get writing. “Life is tough and brimming with loss, and the most we can do about it is to glimpse ourselves clear now and then, and find out what we feel about familiar scenes and recurring faces this time around.” — Roger Angell. Professor Kathryn Eastburn is the author of two published books of literary nonfiction, was co-founder and editor of The Colorado Springs Independent, and writes a personal column, The Middle Distance, each week for KRCC public radio. She teaches journalism and creative nonfiction writing at The Colorado College and is a faculty member of Denver’s Lighthouse Writers Workshop. This workshop is part of the Enrich Your Life! Series of courses for the community.
9 a.m., Armstrong Hall, 14 E. Cache La Poudre St., Tickets: 719-389-6098 or register via the website, $100 with a CC ID, $100 for students, $100 general admission

Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Film: Summer Film Series — “Sunset Boulevard” — The ways we obtain information, and the ways we are entertained, have changed radically over the past 100 years. From the printed page to the silver screen, from the ‘talking box’ to the world wide web, media has undergone a series of revolutions in presentation, in ethics, and in content. What is ‘the media,’ and how is it depicted in movies? How does the constantly-changing media landscape affect not only those who consume media, but also those who create it? This series will examine several fiction and documentary films that shine a light on the evolutions and circumlocutions of our slippery media culture. In “Sunset Boulevard,” a hack screenwriter writes a screenplay for a former silent-film star who has faded into Hollywood obscurity. Directed by Billy Wilder (1950). This series takes place Tuesday evenings for the screening, analysis, and lively discussion of great films with Colorado College professors Dylan Nelson and Clay Haskell.
6:30 p.m., Screening Room, Edith Kinney Gaylord Cornerstone Arts Center, 825 N. Cascade Ave., free

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